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Facebook Posts

7 days ago

Letsgoloco

Bit of history. The Black 5 is the one I built to write the instructions for back in the Chowbent days, so that makes it 22 years old. The LNWR 42 foot full brake, also a Chowbent one, I started around the same time but have had several disasters with the lining. I finished it today so I'm not sure how old that makes it! It's either brand new or vintage. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

Letsgoloco

Proud of this team 💙 ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

Letsgoloco

Another product development announcement, along with the LSWR rodding I'll be printing prototypes of an extended architectural fittings range today, including 3" and 4" pipe offsets, bends and branches. More to come soon! ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

The one good thing about awful weather is that it makes our steam engines look really atmospheric. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

A few steps on from yesterday. Now with transfers from Railtech and works plate from
Narrow Planet.
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

So as well as preparing for the open day I have been helping David Hill from Gladiator to develop the Belpair ex LNWR 4-6-0s. I have just finished the loco that forms the instructions. They will be completed in time for Telford.
This is an LMS modified Belpair Experiment.
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Comment on Facebook

Crumbs those brake shoes are close to the drivers.

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Looks likes you need someone to complete the liningMore 1st top coat on the bubble... ... See MoreSee Less

Looks likes you need someone to complete the lining

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Update on the signal box. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Another beautiful moonlit night at Hampton Loade! ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Stirling 4-2-2 No 1 1938.

Patrick Stirling was the first of a line of mechanical engineers who were sons of the clergy and destined to be responsible for the design of elegant and effective locomotives for the East Coast Route - successors were Ivatt (Atlantics), Gresley (Pacifics) and Peppercorn (Pacifics). Thompson, on the other hand, was the son of a school master.

Stirling joined the Great Northern Railway (GNR) in 1866, succeeding his cousin Archibald Sturrock and he brought with him experience of 'single wheeler' locomotives, which he had introduced on the Glasgow & South Western Railway, as 2-2-2s.

The Stirling Single No 1 seen in this image was the first of a line of 53 4-2-2s built at Doncaster between 1870 and 1875. Built with 8'1" driving wheels they were 'fleet of foot', running some of the fastest trains in the world in the 1870s and hauled 279 ton trains at an average of 50 mph, but achieved up to 85 mph in the 1895 'Race to the North'. The large diameter wheels minimised piston speed which was needed since the science of cylinder lubrication was in its infancy. Novel to locomotive engineering in this country was the use of outside rather than inside cylinders, 18" x 28" the largest in use at the time. The 4-wheel rather than 2-wheel bogie aided lateral stability.

No 1 and its class mates worked the expresses of the day on the GNR until No 1 was withdrawn in 1907 and all the class by 1916.

The locomotive itself was 'saved' and was cosmetically spruced up for attendance at the 1909 Imperial International Exhibition - World Fair at White City, London when it was paired with an old Sturrock tender, which remained with it until re-united with a genuine Stirling tender in the 1990s.

In 1938 No 1 was repaired so that it could work a special on 30th June to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the 1888 'Race to the North’ and this was the opportunity for the LNER to 'show off' its new 1938 'Flying Scotsman' set of carriages and so demonstrate the advances made in '50 years of speed'. On this occasion No 1 with vintage 6-wheel carriages from the original East Coast Joint Stock worked from King's Cross to Stevenage where after display passengers transferred to the new 'Flying Scotsman' set headed by 4498 'Sir Nigel Gresley' for an onward journey on the east coast route before return to London.

Then later in the year the Railway Correspondence and Travel Society (RCTS) organised a rail tour on the 11th September with No 1 taking the train from King's Cross to Peterborough and return.

This image by Chris Duffell is taken on one of those occasions, as the locomotive runs through the area known as Belle Isle between Gasworks Tunnel and Copenhagen Tunnel, passing the Funeral Station building in the background.

Photograph: Eric Fry Collection.
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

End of day two of the Last big job. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Hell of a long shed, Gloucester one was similar, I always thought it was supposed to be the longest

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Modellbahnzentrum Schluchsee - Ihr Ausflugsziel im Hochschwarzwald
BLS RE 85 - Elektrolokomotive Spur H0
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Modellbahnzentrum Schluchsee - Ihr Ausflugsziel im Hochschwarzwald

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Dick Kerr Petrol Electric locomotive on a trial train on the NWNGR at Dinas in February 1917. Note the two ladies by the wagons and the gent to the left of the loco. These locomotives were used with varying degrees of success behind the trenches in WW1. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Work in Progress: 8th August
www.lynton-rail.co.uk/story/work-progress-8th-august-0
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Beavertail 1719 (the BR rebuilt one) now has its first coat of gloss applied as seen in this image by Paul Harrison. I have no news on 1729 (the one being rebuilt to original condition), other than the fact that it is not too far away from completion. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

"East Coast Elegance"

A meeting of Gresley A4 Pacifics at Grantham during the spring of 1938 sees No.4468 ‘Mallard’ rushing south with an express for King's Cross about to pass No.4498 ‘Sir Nigel Gresley’ on a down express.
On 3rd July that year ‘Mallard’ was to break the world speed record for steam traction at 126 mph just south of this point at milepost 90.25.

This painting appears with the kind permission of the artist.
Philip D Hawkins, Fellow of the Guild of Railway Artists.
This fine art print is available directly from, www.quicksilverpublishing.co.uk also from Philip D Hawkins at info@philipdhawkins.co.uk
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Comment on Facebook

I've got that print somewhere. Never got round to framing it as the walls are full!

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

More #FamiliarFaces in #FarawayPlaces
LNWR Coal Tank 1054 is no stranger to the Severn Valley, having visited for galas in 1986, 2012, 2015 and most recently 2019. The loco was once shedded at Shrewsbury and ended its career at Abergavenny. 1054 is seen today keeping dry in the Engine Shed at Ingrow West.
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

On this day in history – 10 August 1927, almost new King class 4-6-0 No 6003 ‘King George IV’ was hauling the down Cornish Riviera Express at 60 mph when the front bogie derailed on straight track at Midgham, Berkshire. The fault was rapidly investigated and traced to the springing of the front bogie. Tests showed that if the bogie axle dropped by 1½ inches on imperfect track the bogie was relieved of its load. The fault was quickly rectified across the class with new coil springing designed by A W J Dymond at Swindon Drawing Office and approved by William Stanier.

The first photograph shows No 6000 ‘King George V’ on its visit to the USA in 1927 before the coil spring modification was added. The second photograph, by Mike Peart, shows the front end No 6005 ‘King George II’ at Swindon works, showing the coil springs fitted to the front axleboxes on the bogie.
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

1450 waits to depart with the first train from Faringdon when Railwells opens at 10.30 this morning ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Beautifully painted figures on Stephen Williams' Farringdon at Railwells @ Wells, Somerset ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Stop press. GWR Railcar No 22 will be running tomorrow. Come along and ride in 1940 splendour. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

Gala news!

We are pleased to announce that BR(WR) Pannier Tank no. 9466 will be joining us as our second visiting loco for our Autumn Gala taking place 30th August - 1st September.

Our thanks go to owner Jonathan Jones-Pratt and our Steam Gala team.

Tickets are now on sale online and kids can travel for only a quid!

More information about the event will be available next week.
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📷 Kenny Felstead
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2 weeks ago

Letsgoloco

On this day in history – 9 August 1837, Isambard Kingdom Brunel met Daniel Gooch in Manchester. Brunel was so impressed by the young Gooch that he immediately offered him the post of Superintendent of Locomotive Engines which he took up nine days later following approval by the Great Western Railway Board.

This drawing is one of the Waverley class of ten locomotives built in 1855 during Gooch’s superintendency. These were the only 4-4-0 tender engines to run on the broad gauge. They were constructed by R Stephenson & Co of Newcastle with coupled wheels 7ft in diameter and the two pairs of leading wheels 4ft 3in diameter. The evocative names they carried were: ‘Lalla Rookh’, ‘Robin Hood’, ‘Ivanhoe’, ‘Waverley’, ‘Pirate’, ‘Rob Roy’, ‘Coueur de Lion’, ‘Red Gauntlet’, ‘Abbot’, ‘Antiquary’.

Gooch remained as GWR locomotive superintendent until 1864, when he left and in the next two years laid the first successful transatlantic cable using Brunel’s steamship ‘Great Eastern’. Howevever, he returned to the GWR as Chairman in 1866 and led the company out of a bleak period, holding the post until 1889, the same year as he died.
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