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Facebook Posts

11 hours ago

Letsgoloco

'HUNSLET 125' : Loco Portrait No.19...

STATFOLD
Hunslet Engine Co., Leeds - Works No.3902
Built: 2005 for Hunslet Steam Company, Statfold Barn
Currently based at Statfold Barn Railway

STATFOLD is a new-build locomotive that was constructed to Hunslet Engine Co's 'Port' Class design - and the first steam locomotive built under the name of Hunslet since the completion of TRANGKIL No.4 in 1971.

Established in 1864, the Hunslet Engine Co. has a long - and complicated - history, having acquired many competing companies over the years. In 1995 the original works closed and the LH Group (then owned by Graham Lee) took over the rights to the name and designs of Hunslet and the companies it had absorbed. A new engineering base was established at Statfold Barn, near Tamworth in Staffs., to undertake boiler work and locomotive maintenance.

The reputation of the 'Quarry Hunslet' for its combination of robustness, simplicity and performance made it an ideal choice for the Hunslet Steam Company's subsequent plans to build new narrow-gauge locomotives.

Key components for a batch of four were ordered and the manufacture of STATFOLD began at Statfold Works. After its entry into service in 2005, work commenced on JACK LANE - a cabless loco with a taller chimney. These two engines have since become the Statfold Barn Railway's roving ambassadors, sharing visits to a number of other railways and events, including a visit to the original Hunslet works at Jack Lane in Leeds.

'HUNSLET 125' details >>> goo.gl/QpE8Mv
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11 hours ago

Letsgoloco

On a dull autumn day, Weymouth's MN Pacific 35029 'Ellerman Lines' pulls out of New Milton with a Waterloo to Weymouth service on 1st October 1965.

Hampshire, England.
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13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Our no.2 steam loco 'Enid' was purchased from the Swiss Locomotive & Manufacturing Co. of Winterhur in 1896, at a cost of £1,525, and is still in service today! ... See MoreSee Less

13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Now this is what I call a Father's Day present. Arrived today ex LNER O2 heavy freight loco. Not sure if they ever strayed on Western Region rails but who cares it is a lovely model. Thanks to my wife and daughter who I love very much not just for this but for putting up with my little hobby ... See MoreSee Less

13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

If you've ever wanted to drive a train, then the Severn Valley Railway is the place to visit!

On Sunday, Class 50 No. 50031 operated our Diesel Footplate Experience, and of the lucky participants had this to say:

"I was the very lucky recipient of a driver experience day with you yesterday, using 50031. I just wanted to say a very big thank you to everyone involved, as our group had a great day.

I also wanted to say well done, as I thought the day was very well organised and run; we were very well looked after, nothing was too much bother and we weren't rushed, which made it all the more enjoyable! A First Class Experience!"

Want a slice of the action? Have a look here: svr.co.uk/Drive-A-Train
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13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

*****Progress on Project 27, working day June 2018*****

An update after our June working day.
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13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Visiting Ivatt 2MT No. 41312 heads a short goods towards Norchard at the Forest of Dean Railway. 17/06/18 ... See MoreSee Less

13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Hello all, thanks for the add. I started building my layout about 2 years ago, I built a shed in the corner of the garden, internally about 13ft x 8ft and have a layout in construction that is based on four ovals, two of which are on an upper perimeter deck. Once I have finished this perimeter area, I plan to bring the main deck inwards making the well smaller, and in the space created I am going to build a terminus station and depot. I've made plenty of mistakes along the way and still have lots to learn and do. Thought I'd post some photos showing what I started with and where I currently am. No doubt the most time-consuming and complex task I've ever undertaken outside my working life! ... See MoreSee Less

13 hours ago

Letsgoloco

As it has a habit of doing, life (and more specifically university) always becomes hectic when you least expect it, so much so that we haven't made an update since before the National Garden Railway Show! Life seems to have finally taken it's steel toe-capped boot off the accelerator so we can finally give you a long overdue, rather long update; and don't worry, we'll make up for our temporary social media hiatus with some new releases in due course! 😉

- Firstly, we would like to thank all of our new and returning customers for making the National Garden Railway Show 2018 our best yet, with all of our shells selling out within the first ten minutes to name one freak occurrence! Your next chance to see us in person will be Llanfair Garden Railway Show over the 1st and 2nd of September with the Yorkshire Show following in October.

- SHELLS ARE BACK IN STOCK! I REPEAT, SHELLS ARE BACK IN STOCK! After our sell out at the National Show, we quickly re-stocked our stores with both 15 and 9.2 inch varieties.

- A new batch of FR Bolster Waggon kits (£56 a pair) are beginning to be made though there will still be at most a week's wait between placing your order and dispatch due to ordering the high quality Slaters components as and when
required (they are not student wallet friendly).

- Oxford Circus Trench Tramway Wagons are temporarily out of stock until next week but are still available to order.

- Between April and June, the FR Bolster Waggons along with the Birkhill Fireclay Mine Hutch, Oxford Circus and Threlkeld Tub have featured in both Garden Rail and SMT, something we are rather proud of!

And last but not least, we would love to see some of the wonderful models built from our kits and be able to feature them on our website ( www.harecroft.co.uk ), such as the excellent Oxford Circus Trench Tramway Wagon's below by Martin Haywood. As a small thank you, posting a picture below this post or to our page will enter your name into a raffle to win a Birkhill Firelcay Mine Hutch kit of your preferred gauge. Entry into the raffle ends in two weeks time on the 3rd of July so there is still plenty of time to build that kit you have been putting off!

~ Harecroft ~
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14 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Hot on the heels of our 4mm version is the Prototype of 2mm version of our popular LNER playelayers hut. ... See MoreSee Less

14 hours ago

Letsgoloco

LNER P2s – Success or Failure?

P2 2-8-2 No 2006 “Wolf of Badenoch” is seen near Cove Bay on 23rd July 1938. The locomotive is tackling the climb to Portlethen, one of many steep ascents to be encountered on the journey from Aberdeen to Dundee. Although the locomotive is climbing, the fireman appears to be sitting comfortably. 2006 was the last of the P2s to enter traffic on 5th September 1936. Initially allocated to Haymarket, it spent most of its time as a P2 allocated to Aberdeen’s Ferryhill shed. Returning to Haymarket in October 1942, the locomotive remained there until January 1944 when it entered Doncaster Works for rebuilding into an A2/2 Pacific.

The train seems to comprise only seven coaches and is therefore one which would appear to be easily capable of haulage by a less powerful locomotive. However, the timetable was built around the traffic on offer and it was not always possible to keep the most powerful locomotives on the heaviest trains. A further complication was that the LNER was allowed access to only three of the ten shed roads at Ferryhill and space was always at a premium. Although Haymarket’s and Dundee’s P2s had regular duties, Ferryhill’s P2s were pooled with the shed’s V2s between the No 1 and No 2 links. This was in order to make the most effective use of its motive power, the P2s generally being allocated to the heaviest trains on a day to day basis. No 1 link covered the passenger trains whilst No 2 link covered the meat and fish trains to the south.

Prior to the arrival of the P2s, the situation was such that the only way to service all the traffic on offer from Aberdeen was by sending up additional motive power from Dundee, 71 miles away, and this was one of the reasons for the aversion to double heading on the Aberdeen Road. The North British Atlantics had originally been designed to work the heaviest trains on this route. However, the introduction of 2nd Class sleeping cars in 1928 took the weight of the heaviest trains beyond their haulage capacity and regular double heading was reintroduced. The arrival of Gresley’s A1 Pacifics to the route in 1930 brought little relief as they could only haul one coach more than the Atlantics. Furthermore, weight restrictions prevented the Pacifics from double heading between Edinburgh and Kinnaber Junction. This meant that it was necessary to retain parallel fleets of Atlantics and Pacifics at both Dundee and Aberdeen, adding to the congestion within the depots. In 1931 the Scottish Area asked for a locomotive that could work the heaviest trains over this line without assistance. These locomotives were specifically required to work the two daytime trains which conveyed the through Aberdeen portion of the “Flying Scotsman” in both directions, the overnight “Aberdonian” sleeper service to King’s Cross and the aforementioned meat and fish trains to London.

Gresley produced an eight coupled locomotive to provide both the power to move the heaviest loads and the acceleration required to speed up the schedules on a route littered with station stops, sharp curvature and steep gradients. Initially a 4-8-2 was proposed but, as this would have been too long to fit the turntables which had recently been installed to accommodate the Pacifics, the design evolved into a 2-8-2.

The two ‘prototype’ P2s, “Cock o’ the North” and “Earl Marischal” appeared in 1934 and, after numerous trials, the four ‘production’ P2s arrived in 1936. The P2s proved to be a controversial design. Many commentators, doubtless heavily influenced by the well established writings of a certain Haymarket driver, blindly accept his criticisms, many of which have subsequently been brought into question, and interpret the conversion of six P2s to Pacifics as an indication of their failure.

The achievements of the P2s were short lived but for the first few years of their existence they appear to have been highly regarded. They had an unblemished accident record. They successfully moved the heavy trains that Gresley’s Pacifics had proved incapable of working north of Edinburgh. Not only did they move those trains, they also brought about a reduction in journey time between Edinburgh and Aberdeen that had not been possible since the North British era and which subsequently was never bettered until dieselisation. In eliminating double heading, they brought about a reduction in the volume of coal consumed and man hours expended in working traffic over this route.

Coal consumption was heavy. They were big engines and the nature of the route was such that the locomotives were either braking for a speed restriction or accelerating away from one. Demands on the locomotive were constantly changing and, even once the P2s had ceased to exist, the problem of heavy coal consumption over this route continued to exercise the minds of motive power planners. Perusal of the P2 consumption figures for 1937-1939 shows that the pounds per mile statistics were on a par with that of the Scottish A1s, the P2 figures being marginally better in 1937. Bearing in mind the virtual elimination of double heading and associated light engine movements, the P2 figures compare favourably against those of the A1s.

The Achilles heel of the P2 was the leading truck. The same truck had previously been used on Gresley’s K3 class and was also used on his highly successful V2 class. The purpose of the truck was to guide the locomotive into curvature but the springing arrangement proved to be less than ideal resulting in uneven weight distribution which in turn led to excessive bearing wear, connecting rod bush wear and ultimately crank axle failures. These shortcomings were known about and there was some pressure from certain quarters to redesign the springing of the leading truck to address these problems. Indeed, some experimentation had been carried out on a K3 as early as 1934. However, there were other priorities and within three years of the last of the P2s entering service the country was at war. Maintenance standards suffered and the situation was exacerbated by Gresley’s death in 1941. Thompson, Gresley’s successor moved responsibility for P2 maintenance from Doncaster to Cowlairs at a time when their most experienced engineers had been drafted to work in the shipyards and the shortfall made up with inexperienced directed labour. Availability inevitably suffered. It would appear that Thompson had no interest in addressing the issues with the P2s and saw them as raw material for rebuilding into a Pacific of his design.

Trials on the Aberdeen road with the unique W1 4-6-4 in sunny weather in May and June 1942 “proved” that a six coupled locomotive could handle the heaviest loads with ease and the six P2s were ultimately converted into Thompson’s “replacement for the P1, P2 and V2” the A2/2 between 1943 and 1945. However, although the new Pacifics were initially allocated to the Aberdeen route, like all the Pacifics that had gone before and all those to come, they proved incapable of reliably working the heaviest trains. By 1946 the A2/2 Pacifics appeared only rarely on passenger duties and were to be found primarily on express freight, meat and fish workings. Once the Peppercorn A2s arrived, the A2/2s were transferred away in 1949/50 to the Eastern and North Eastern Regions where they apparently were able to give a reasonably good account of themselves on the East Coast Main Line. Eventually maximum load limits of 440 tons (A1) and 420 tons (A4) were imposed between Aberdeen and Edinburgh, presumably because there was no longer any locomotive capable of working the 550+ ton trains of the past.

In the meantime, a number of derailments involving V2s in 1946 ultimately resulted in modifications to the springing arrangement of the leading trucks of all 184 V2s. Sadly the P2s had not lasted long enough to benefit from this modification.

Fortunately, research in recent years has seen the release of a great deal of information, not previously available. It appears that the P2s were held in high regard by those who worked with them on a daily basis such as E D Trask, Locomotive Running Superintendent, Edinburgh, Geoffrey Lund, Shedmaster at Haymarket 1944 – 1947 and various members of footplate staff who actually worked on the locomotives.

Perhaps if the P2s had lasted longer and been given more of an opportunity to prove themselves they may have been regarded in the same light as Gresley’s other designs. Fortunately, the P2 Steam Locomotive Company are currently constructing a new P2 involving many of the improvements proposed. Whilst it will no longer be possible to recreate the traffic conditions of the late 1930s, let us hope that the new locomotive can provide us with some answers!

Words: Brian McDevitt.
Photograph: Eric Fry Collection.
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Featuring in my new summer exhibition, "Miles on the Brush" (a sort of mini retrospective), is this very early piece from 1981. "Tyseley Shed". Oil on board 18" x 20".
Peter Cunningham. Associate Member Guild of Railway Artists. Member of the American society of Railway Artists.
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Drive a steam train on Friday!

Join us on the morning Introductory Footplate Experience on Friday 22nd June with No. 1450. Try your hand at driving and firing this lovely little loco for 8 miles, and you can bring along 4 guests to travel in the carriage too.

Normally £350, book it now for £250!

Call 01562 757900 now...
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Power car 42 in the HST Servicing Shed on A-Road having recently acquired its green livery. Did you know?: This was originally the chosen power car to wear the Old Oak Common HST Depot 1976-2018 name plate and OOC111 vehicle wrap to commemorate 42 years of the Service Shed and life of the fleet. Unfortunately it wasn't sporting the green livery at the time and a couple of weeks before it was not fitting into the exam programme and due to fleet requirements could not be stopped for so long to be painted and then wrapped. Therefore 43093 was chosen, another power car that had seen allocation to OOC for a period. It is nice to see 43042 received its refreshed paintwork. ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

In a slight change to the advertised loco, Alice is offering ‘Driver for a Fiver’ at Llanuwchllyn station with Dinorwic slate wagons at various intervals throughout the day, an interloper on Penrhyn Day!

bala-lake-railway.co.uk/events/
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

On this day in history – 18 June 1850, the South Wales Railway opened a 75 mile stretch of broad gauge line between Chepstow and Swansea (Landore). The line stopped at Chepstow as the bridge over the River Wye wasn’t quite finished. In October 1852 a thirty mile stretch was added from Landore to Carmarthen and in January 1854 another 31 miles as far as Haverfordwest. The final nine miles from Haverfordwest to Milford Haven was opened in April 1856. This photograph shows Milford Haven in the 1870s.

On 19 July 1852 the Chepstow Bridge opened, allowing through trains between London and Swansea. An Act of Parliament was passed in July 1863 to amalgamate the South Wales company with the Great Western Railway. Having reached the coast, it wasn't until 1871 when the GWR was allowed to operate steamship services to Ireland and British ports. The GWR bought four ships in 1872 which was the start of the company's shipping operations. In the same year the South Wales main line was converted from broad to narrrow (standard) gauge.
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Neu angekündigt: Baureihe 218 der Brohltalbahn als Sonderserie von Roco für Menzels Lokschuppen in H0

Exklusiv für Menzels Lokschuppen legt Roco die 218 396 der Brohltalbahn in der Baugröße H0 auf. Die Lok wird sowohl für Gleich- als auch für Wechselstrom erhältlich sein.
Im Juli 1898 wurde mit dem Bau der Schmalspurbahn durch das Brohltal begonnen. Hierzu wurde bereits 1896 die Brohltal-Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft gegründet, die auch für den Betrieb zuständig war. Dabei spielte der Personenverkehr eine untergeordnete Rolle. Mit einigen Unterbrechungen war der Transport von Phonolith (Glasherstellung) vom Steinbruch in Brenk nach Brohl/Hafen die Haupteinnahmequelle. Ab 1992 bietet die Betriebs-GmbH auch bundesweite Gütertransporte auf der Normalspur an.
Seit Dezember 2017 steht hierfür die 218 396 zur Verfügung. Im DB-Ausbesserungswerk Bremen wurde die von MAK, 1975 an die DB gelieferte Diesellokomotive hauptuntersucht und in den Produktfarben der Brohltalbahn lackiert. Zur Zeit erfolgt der Einsatz insbesondere vor dem Alu-Zug. Hierbei werden Aluminium-Blöcke von der Aluminium-Hütte in Voerde-Spellen zur Aleris GmbH in Koblenz transportiert. Dort wird das Material zu Platten, Blechen und Bändern weiter verarbeitet. Dieser Zug läuft in der Regel montags, mittwochs und freitags. Daneben gibt es auch noch Einsätze im Sonderzugverkehr. So konnte man die grün/gelbe 218 auch anlässlich des Dampfspektakels 2018 zusammen mit 01 150 im Personenzug-Dienst bewundern.
Demnächst kann diese Maschine mit ihrer attraktiven Farbgebung auch zum Blickfang auf ihrer Modellbahnanlage oder in der Vitrine werden.

Roco 73870 - Diesellok BR 218 der Brohltalbahn für die Epoche 6 - Limitiert auf 150 Stück
www.menzels-lokschuppen.de/Modellbahnen/Dieselloks/Roco-73870-Brohltalbahn-Diesellok-BR-218-Ep-6....

DCC Sound: Roco 73871 - Diesellok BR 218 der Brohltalbahn für die Epoche 6 - Limitiert auf 150 Stück
www.menzels-lokschuppen.de/Modellbahnen/Dieselloks/Roco-73871-Brohltalbahn-Diesellok-BR-218-Ep-6....

AC Sound: Roco 79871 - Diesellok BR 218 der Brohltalbahn für die Epoche 6 - Limitiert auf 100 Stück
www.menzels-lokschuppen.de/Modellbahnen/Dieselloks/Roco-79871-Brohltalbahn-Diesellok-BR-218-Ep-6-...

Modelldetails:
Motor mit Schwungmasse. Antrieb auf vier Achsen, zwei Haftreifen. PluX16-Digitalschnittstelle. Kupplungsaufnahme nach NEM 362. Dreilicht-Spitzensignal weiß/rot (LED) mit der Fahrtrichtung wechselnd. Mit digital schaltbaren Soundfunktionen. Limitierte Auflage. Auslieferung Anfang 2019.
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Countdown to the opening of The Signalling Centre over the weekend of 23 and 24 June. The finishing touches are being made to the building and display. The first photo shows Stephen vacuuming the carpet tiles on the floor of the Swindon room, while Peter is replacing lower covers on the main Swindon panel. The second photo shows Jamie cleaning the wood surround of the panel with white spirit before varnishing it. The covers above the track diagram have been removed while the varnishing is taking place, revealing the wiring that has been installed by members of the Swindon Panel Society over the past two years to operate the display in its new home. The third photo shows Jamie applying the varnish. The fourth photo shows Laurence cleaning one of the keyboards that control the train describers. The final photo shows Laurence cleaning the contacts beneath one of the tiles that make up the surface of the panel.

We hope to welcome you at Didcot Railway Centre next weekend to view this important new exhibition of the history of railway signalling.
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Locomotive engineering is six months of hard work that doesn't look like you've done anything at all, then in 3 hours you can have an instant transformation! With Isaac's boiler and cab back in place we can now really crack on and get it going again... 👍 ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

All the locos are tucked up in the shed at the end of a fantastic gala, but the fun doesn’t stop there!

Tomorrow is the start of visiting engines week, and Gwynedd will be in charge of the trains over the next two days (along with Marchlyn topping and tailing some services)

Normal fares and standard blue timetable apply, do come along for a ride if you can!

bala-lake-railway.co.uk/events
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

This weekend we are scheduled to start our annual summer running of our vintage trains. This applies for 23rd, 24th and 30th June and dates marked Red on our timetable for July and August.

On these dates we will be running our regular Steam “A” set with wheelchair access and on-train catering (Pre-booking essential) and the second service will also be steam and composed of our vintage train. Formations of the vintage trains may vary.
www.kesr.org.uk/your-visit/timetable
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Who would like a behind the scenes tour of the KWVR?

Encounter the excitement and nostalgia of the Haworth’s renowned locomotive works, with its distinctive sounds and smells, get up close to our fleet of Steam and Diesel locomotives with knowledgeable commentary from your experienced guide

For more information about times and locations please visit our website.

kwvr.co.uk/50th-guided-tours/
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

A big welcome to locomotive Wissington who will be spending the summer at Beamish! 🚂

This 1938 engine is on loan from the M&GN Railway Society and will be with us till mid-September!
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22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

"Where's your headboard?"... D9009 Alycidon proudly displays the Albert Gilmour memorial charter headboard at Kings Cross 16/06/2018 photo Adrian Newling-Goode ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

D9009 Alycidon at Kings Cross on 16/06/2018 photo Adrian Newling-Goode ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

TME Vale of Rheidol "Owain Glyndwr" in BR green livery ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Here at Crymlyn A Shop, Dai the paint has been hard at work....... ... See MoreSee Less

22 hours ago

Letsgoloco

Bala Lake Railway
Hugh Napier departing with the second Quarryman’s train of the day, Gwynedd had just arrived with the Penrhyn Goods...

bala-lake-railway.co.uk/events
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Bala Lake Railway
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